The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

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Description

Product Description

This beloved novel tells the story of Edmond Dantès, wrongfully imprisoned for life in the supposedly impregnable sea fortress, the Château d’If. After a daring escape, and after unearthing a hidden treasure revealed to him by a fellow prisoner, he devotes the rest of his life to tracking down and punishing the enemies who wronged him.

Though a brilliant storyteller, Dumas was given to repetitions and redundancies; this slightly streamlined version of the original 1846 English translation speeds the narrative flow while retaining most of the rich pictorial descriptions and all the essential details of Dumas’s intricately plotted and thrilling masterpiece.

Alexandre Dumas’s epic novel of justice, retribution, and self-discovery—one of the most enduringly popular adventure tales ever written—in a newly revised translation.

Review

“A piece of perfect storytelling.” —Robert Louis Stevenson

About the Author

Alexandre Dumas was born in 1802 in France and died in 1870.

Umberto Eco is the author of The Name of the Rose and Foucault’s Pendulum.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter I

ON FEBRUARY 24, 1815, the watchtower at Marseilles signaled the arrival of the three-master Pharaon, coming from Smyrna, Trieste and Naples.

The quay was soon covered with the usual crowd of curious onlookers, for the arrival of a ship is always a great event in Marseilles, especially when, like the Pharaon, it has been built, rigged and laden in the city and belongs to a local shipowner.

Meanwhile the vessel was approaching the harbor under topsails, jib and foresail, but so slowly and with such an air of melancholy that the onlookers, instinctively sensing misfortune, began to wonder what accident could have happened on board. However, the experienced seamen among them saw that if there had been an accident, it could not have happened to the ship herself, for she had every appearance of being under perfect control. Standing beside the pilot, who was preparing to steer the Pharaon through the narrow entrance of the harbor, was a young man who, with vigilant eyes and rapid gestures, watched every movement of the ship and repeated each of the pilot''s orders.

The vague anxiety hovering over the crowd affected one man so much that he could not wait until the ship entered the harbor: he leaped into a small boat and ordered the boatman to row him out to meet the Pharaon.

When he saw this man coming toward him, the young sailor left his post beside the pilot and walked over to the side of the ship, holding his hat in his hand. He was a tall, slender young man, no more than twenty years old, with dark eyes and hair as black as ebony. His whole manner gave evidence of that calmness and resolution peculiar to those who have been accustomed to facing danger ever since their childhood.

"Ah, it''s you, Dantès!" cried the man in the boat. "What''s happened? Why does everything look so gloomy on board?"

"A great misfortune, Monsieur Morrel!" replied the young man. "We lost our brave Captain Leclère off Civitavecchia."

"What about the cargo?" asked the shipowner eagerly.

"It arrived safely, Monsieur Morrel, and I think you''ll be satisfied on that score, but poor Captain Leclère--"

"What happened to him?" asked the shipowner, visibly relieved.

"He died of brain fever, in horrible agony. He''s now at rest off the Isle of II Giglio, sewed up in his hammock with one cannon ball at his head and another at his feet." The young man smiled sadly and added, "How ironic-he waged war against the English for ten long years and then died in his bed like anyone else."

"Well, we''re all mortal," said the shipowner, "and the old must make way for the young, otherwise there would be no promotion."

As they were passing the Round Tower, the young sailor called out, "Make ready to lower topsails, foresail and jib!" The order was executed as smartly as on board a man-of-war. "Lower away and brail all!" At this last order all the sails were lowered and the ship''s speed became almost imperceptible.

"And now, if you''d like to come aboard, Monsieur Morrel," said Dantès, seeing the shipowner''s impatience, "you can talk to your purser, Monsieur Danglars, who''s just coming out of his cabin. He can give you all the information you want. As for myself, I must look after the anchoring and dress the ship in mourning."

The shipowner did not wait to be invited twice. He grasped the line which Dantès threw to him and, with an agility that would have done credit to a sailor, climbed up the ladder attached to the ship''s side. Dantès returned to his duties, while Danglars came out to meet Monsieur Morrel. The purser was a man of twenty-five or twenty-six with a rather melancholy face, obsequious to his superiors and arrogant to his subordinates. He was as much disliked by the crew as Edmond Dantès was liked by them.

"Well, Monsieur Morrel," said Danglars, "I suppose you''ve heard about our misfortune."

"Yes, I have. Poor Captain Leclère! He was a brave and honorable man."

"And an excellent seaman, too, grown old between the sky and the water, as a man should be when he''s entrusted with the interests of such an important firm as Morrel and Son."

"But," said the shipowner, watching Dantès preparing to drop anchor, "it seems to me a man doesn''t have to be old to do his work well, Danglars. Our friend Edmond there doesn''t look as though he needs advice from anyone."

"Yes," said Danglars, casting Dantès a glance full of hatred, "he''s young and he has no doubts about anything. As soon as the captain was dead he took command without consulting anyone, and he made us lose a day and a half at the Isle of Elba instead of coming straight back to Marseilles."

"As for taking command," said the shipowner, "it was his duty as first mate, but he was wrong to waste a day and a half at the Isle of Elba, unless the ship needed some sort of repairs."

"The ship was as sound as I am and as I hope you are, Monsieur Morrel. Wasting that day and a half was nothing but a whim of his; he just wanted to go ashore for a while, that''s all."

"Dantès," said Morrel, turning toward the young man, "come here, please."

"Excuse me, sir, I''ll be with you in a moment," said Dantès. Then, turning to the crew, he called out, "Let go!" The anchor dropped immediately and the chain rattled noisily. Dantès walked over to Morrel.

"I wanted to ask you why you stopped at the Isle of Elba."

"It was to carry out an order from Captain Leclère. As he was dying he gave me a package to deliver to Marshal Bertrand there."

"Did you see him, Edmond?"

"Yes."

Morrel looked around and drew Dantès off to one side. "How is the emperor?" he asked eagerly.

"He''s well, as far as I could tell. He came into the marshal''s room while I was there."

"Did you talk to him?"

"No, he talked to me," said Dantès, smiling.

"What did he say?"

"He asked me about the ship, when it had left for Marseilles, what route it had taken and what cargo it was carrying. I think that if the ship had been empty and I had been its owner he would have tried to buy it from me, but I told him I was only the first mate and that it belonged to the firm of Morrel and Son. ''I know that firm,'' he said. ''The Morrels have been shipowners for generations and there was a Morrel in my regiment when I was garrisoned at Valence.'' "

"That''s true!" exclaimed Morrel, delighted. "It was Policar Morrel, my uncle. He later became a captain." Then, giving Dantès a friendly tap on the shoulder, he said, "You were quite right to follow Captain Leclère''s instructions and stop at the Isle of Elba, although you might get into trouble if it became known that you gave the marshal a package and spoke to the emperor."

"How could it get me into trouble?" asked Dantès. "I don''t even know what was in the package, and the emperor only asked me the same questions he would have asked any other newcomer. But excuse me for a moment, sir; I see the health and customs officers coming on board."

Danglars stepped up as the young man walked away. "Well," he said, "he seems to have given you some good reasons for his stopover."

"He gave me excellent reasons, Monsieur Danglars."

"That''s good; it''s always painful to see a friend fail to do his duty."

"Dantès did his duty well," replied the shipowner. "It was Captain Leclère, who ordered the stopover."

"Speaking of Captain Leclère, didn''t Dantès give you a letter from him?"

"No. Was there one?"

"I thought Captain Leclère gave him a letter along with the package."

"What package, Danglars?"

"Why, the one Dantès delivered to the Isle of Elba."

"How do you know he delivered a package there?"

Danglars flushed. "The captain''s door was ajar when I was passing by," he said, "and I saw him give Dantès a package and a letter."

"He didn''t say anything to me about it, but if he has the letter I''m sure he''ll give it to me."

Danglars was silent for a moment, then he said, "Monsieur Morrel, please don''t mention it to Dantès; I must have been mistaken."

Just then Dantès returned and Danglars walked away.

"Well, Dantès, have you finished now?"

"Yes, sir."

"Then will you come to dinner with us?"

"Please excuse me, Monsieur Morrel, but I think I owe my first visit to my father. Just the same, I''m grateful for the honor of your invitation."

"You''re right, Dantès. You''re a good son. But we''ll be expecting you after you''ve visited your father."

"Excuse me again, Monsieur Morrel, but after that first visit there''s another one that''s equally important to me."

"Oh, yes; I was forgetting that there''s someone who must be waiting for you as impatiently as your father-the beautiful Mercédès. You''re a lucky man, Edmond, and you have a very pretty mistress."

"She''s not my mistress, sir," said the young sailor gravely. "She''s my fiancée."

"That''s sometimes the same thing," said Morrel, laughing.

"Not with us, sir," replied Dantès.

"Well, I won''t keep you any longer; you''ve taken care of my affairs so well that I want to give you as much time as possible to take care of your own. Do you have anything else to tell me?"

"No."

"Didn''t Captain Leclère give you a letter for me before he died?"

"He was unable to write, sir. But that reminds me that I must ask you for two weeks'' leave."

"To get married?"

"First of all; and then to go to Paris."

"Very well, take as long as you like, Dantès. It will take at least six weeks to unload the cargo, and we won''t be ready to put to sea again before another three months or so. But in three months you''ll have to be here. The Pharaon," continued the shipowner, patting the young sailor on the shoulder, "can''t leave without her captain."

"Without her captain!" cried Dantès, his eyes flashing with joy. "Do you really intend to make me captain of the Pharaon?"

"If I were alone, my dear Dantès, I''d shake your hand and say, ''It''s done.'' But I have a partner, and you know the Italian proverb, ''He who has a partner has a master.'' The thing is at least half done, though, since you already have one vote out of two. Leave it to me to get you the other one; I''ll do my best."

"Oh, Monsieur Morrel!" cried Dantès, grasping the ship-owner''s hand with tears in his eyes. "I thank you in the name of my father and of Mercédès."

"That''s all right, Edmond. Go see your father, go see Mercedes, then come back to see me."

"Don''t you want me to take you ashore?"

"No, thanks; I''ll stay on board and look over the accounts with Danglars. Were you satisfied with him during the trip?"

"That depends on how you mean the question, sir. If you''re asking me if I was satisfied with him as a comrade, the answer is no; I think he''s disliked me ever since the day we had a little quarrel and I was foolish enough to suggest that we stop for ten minutes at the Isle of Monte Cristo to settle it, a suggestion which I was wrong to make and which he was right to refuse. But if you''re speaking of him as a purser, I think there''s nothing to be said against him and that you''ll be quite satisfied with the way he''s done his work."

"If you were captain of the Pharaon, would you be glad to keep him?"

"Whether I''m captain or first mate, Monsieur Morrel," replied Dantès. "I''ll always have great respect for those who have the confidence of my shipowners."

"Good, good, Dantès! I see you''re a fine young man in every way. But don''t let me hold you back any longer-I can see how anxious you are to leave."

"May I take your skiff?"

"Certainly."

"Good-bye, Monsieur Morrel, and thank you from the bottom of my heart."

The young sailor leaped into the skiff and sat down in the stern, giving orders to be rowed to the Canebière. Smiling, the shipowner watched him until he saw him jump ashore, after which he was immediately swallowed up in the crowd. When he turned around, Morrel saw Danglars standing behind him, also following the young sailor''s movements. But there was a great difference in the expression of the two men as they both watched Edmond Dantès.

--

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4.8 out of 54.8 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Dalton from Miami
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Conflicting/Wrong information in product description
Reviewed in the United States on November 7, 2019
Although the product description describes this version as "streamlined" the page count implies this is the unabridged version. The product I received is only 500 pages - the abridged version.
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C. M Mills
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Count of Monte Cristo is one of the greatest of all adventure novels
Reviewed in the United States on January 29, 2021
The Count of Monte Cristo is one of Alexandre Dumas pere''s greatest creations. The story of the French sailor Edmond Dantes who is falsely accused of treason against the government of Louis XVIII is fascinating and readable. The Everyman edition runs to over 1100... See more
The Count of Monte Cristo is one of Alexandre Dumas pere''s greatest creations. The story of the French sailor
Edmond Dantes who is falsely accused of treason against the government of Louis XVIII is fascinating and readable.
The Everyman edition runs to over 1100 pages but keeps the attention of the reader. We see how Cristo escaped prison and obtained a vast treasure horde on the advice of his fellow prisoner a clergyman. We then see how he wrought revenge against the three men who had plotted his downfall. Along the way there are many other characters with tales to tell of their own. This is great novel whose cinematic pace makes for many hours of reading pleasure. Highly recommended. A true classic of French Romanticism.
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Kuni
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Don''t let the page numbers scare you away from reading this amazing story
Reviewed in the United States on January 13, 2018
4.75 Amazon, please give us the ability to rate in smaller scales so that I can give this book a more precise review. THIS IS AN OPINION FROM ONE READER THAT REALLY ENJOYED THE BOOK. This book took me about 3 months to finish (due to school and... See more
4.75
Amazon, please give us the ability to rate in smaller scales so that I can give this book a more precise review.

THIS IS AN OPINION FROM ONE READER THAT REALLY ENJOYED THE BOOK.

This book took me about 3 months to finish (due to school and other required texts I had to read). The book does a great job of portraying the setting and the characters, to a point that it felt more like reading a description of a landscape painting.

The characters were all very well established in their detail and motives, although it had a bad habit of putting too much details into the characters conversation that became difficult to follow at times.

This book took me through a long and arduous journey of a man who vowed to take revenge from the people who took everything from him. At times the journey was dull or too detail oriented, but these short comings are overshadowed by the other moments that are epic, dramatic, and satisfying.
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Lindamarion
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
When there is no legal recourse, "vengeance" = justice
Reviewed in the United States on November 18, 2020
Great classic novel on the theme of righteous vengeance. Though Dumas repeatedly credits "god" with enabling the justice Dantes'' brings down upon the heads of the vile criminals who stole 14 years of his life, it is "Monte Cristo''s" masterly manipulation of the weaknesses... See more
Great classic novel on the theme of righteous vengeance. Though Dumas repeatedly credits "god" with enabling the justice Dantes'' brings down upon the heads of the vile criminals who stole 14 years of his life, it is "Monte Cristo''s" masterly manipulation of the weaknesses and greed of his targets and their often equally reprehensible associates. The "dramatizations" are often cowardly and groveling to the morality of "selflessness" by omitting the well-deserved happy ending. Glad to re-acquaint myself with this classic in this time of "planemics" and "resets".
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Mel C. Thompson
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Everyone Should Read This
Reviewed in the United States on January 27, 2020
It''s a great book. It deals with how disposable anyone can be when they, even accidentally, become an inconvenience to powerful people. And it also shows that even if one is vindicated, the people who betray you can probably be never made to feel badly about it; and thus,... See more
It''s a great book. It deals with how disposable anyone can be when they, even accidentally, become an inconvenience to powerful people. And it also shows that even if one is vindicated, the people who betray you can probably be never made to feel badly about it; and thus, the book shows that total revenge is impossible and needlessly destructive. Also, in a way, there is a lesson that total vindication of one''s self is probably not possible, because to even seek the vindication, one has to become a different person. Once one is betrayed, there''s no way to "win" in the way one might hope.
4 people found this helpful
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Eric Leventhal
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Lots of Errors
Reviewed in the United States on September 10, 2020
This Kindle version of The Count of Monte Cristo has a mistake in the very first sentence: "On the 24th of February, 1810, the look out at..." That should be 1815. I''ve read 18 chapters and seen more such mistakes as well as typos, transposed sentences... See more
This Kindle version of The Count of Monte Cristo has a mistake in the very first sentence:
"On the 24th of February, 1810, the look out at..."
That should be 1815.

I''ve read 18 chapters and seen more such mistakes as well as typos, transposed sentences and misformatted pages.

Don''t buy this version.
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Timothy R. Baldwin
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wonderful but Extremely Long
Reviewed in the United States on September 1, 2018
Admittedly, I intermittently read and listened to this story. There were times where the story of Edmond Dantès and his revenge was lost amidst an incredibly long set up from the time of his escape to the time he first reveals himself to one of the four responsible for his... See more
Admittedly, I intermittently read and listened to this story. There were times where the story of Edmond Dantès and his revenge was lost amidst an incredibly long set up from the time of his escape to the time he first reveals himself to one of the four responsible for his imprisonment. But, if you can simultaneously ‘wait and hope’ as Dumas recommends regarding the greatest of man’s wisdom, then you will be satisfied with the final chapters.
6 people found this helpful
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Sheila CV.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Nicely bound
Reviewed in the United States on January 9, 2018
A great classic. Nicely bound!
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MsRodriguez
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
One of the all time greats. Revenge is sweet...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 31, 2017
One of the all time great adventure novels. Do not be intimidated by its page count or age, this novel is every bit a gripping page turner as anything written by modern writers such as G.R.R Martin, if not more so. I first read this book as a teenager (which I think is an...See more
One of the all time great adventure novels. Do not be intimidated by its page count or age, this novel is every bit a gripping page turner as anything written by modern writers such as G.R.R Martin, if not more so. I first read this book as a teenager (which I think is an perfect age to first read this titan of a classic) and the story has cemented itself into my heart with its unforgettable characters, interweaving sub plots and fascinating historical details, amongst its many other treasures. Each time I finish this novel, I get that feeling of sadness one experiences after returning home from a holiday in the sun. Revenge, romance, swashbuckling action, beautiful backdrops, moments of dark, brooding suspense...I could go on and on. At the risk of sounded cliched and contrived, it has all these things and more. But instead of reading my amateurish ramblings, I urge you, if you are thinking of doing so, to pick up a copy and get stuck in. The copy I have is the Everyman''s Library edition which is just beautiful and includes an introduction by Umberto Eco (Author of The Name of The Rose) notes on the text, and a chronology of historical events, literary context and the author''s life which is an interesting feature not often found in other editions. The quality is exceptional as these books are made to last years and years. I''d like to note that the service I recieved from BOOKS etc was impeccable, which seems to be a rare occurrence with a lot of Amazon sellers. The book arrived in perfect condition and deserves every one of the five stars I have awarded it. 100% reccommended.
12 people found this helpful
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RYAN FIENNES
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Everyman''s Library
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 2, 2021
I purchased this book in the Everyman''s Library Classics Edition. The Everyman''s Library Classics Edition books are, in my opinion, the best quality books available in the price-range. They are quality bound: with acid-free paper; dust jacket; and ribbon page marker. There...See more
I purchased this book in the Everyman''s Library Classics Edition. The Everyman''s Library Classics Edition books are, in my opinion, the best quality books available in the price-range. They are quality bound: with acid-free paper; dust jacket; and ribbon page marker. There are also a great range of authors available in this collection, and they are very reasonably priced.
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Chivz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Simply one of the greatest adventure novels ever written in a beautiful volume - ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 2, 2015
Simply one of the greatest adventure novels ever written in a beautiful volume - however - if you do buy it don''t bother with reading the curious introduction by Umberto Eco who is not a fan of the book, is incredibly negative about it, and could actually put you off...See more
Simply one of the greatest adventure novels ever written in a beautiful volume - however - if you do buy it don''t bother with reading the curious introduction by Umberto Eco who is not a fan of the book, is incredibly negative about it, and could actually put you off enjoying it! A very strange choice by the publisher! Other than that though a great volume - exactly as expected from Everyman. Everyone should read this book and go on the ultimate adventure!
2 people found this helpful
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shrek
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
poor quality
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on July 2, 2021
Poor quality paper Print is too small to read comfortably Another rip off
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Disgruntled customer
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Mechanics waiting room copy?
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 21, 2021
Love the book, however, the copy arrived covered in grease and some kind of adhesive. Either it''s second hand as previously undescribed, or has been handled by a mechanic, either way it''s dirty and will not be going on a shelf, not happy at all.
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The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

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The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

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The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

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The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online

The Count lowest of Monte Cristo online sale (Everyman's Library) online